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dc.contributor.authorCaulley, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorCatala-Lopez, Ferran 
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorKhoury, Michel
dc.contributor.authorFerraro, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Wei
dc.contributor.authorHusereau, Don
dc.contributor.authorAltman, Douglas G.
dc.contributor.authorMoher, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-08T07:01:04Z
dc.date.available2020-05-08T07:01:04Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationJ Clin Epidemiol. 2020 Mar 14;122:87-94es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0895-4356es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/9966
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Appropriate use of reporting guidelines of health research ensures that articles present readers with a consistent representation of study relevance, methodology, and results. This study evaluated the use of major reporting guidelines. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional analysis of health research articles citing four major reporting guidelines indexed in the Web of Science Core Collection (up to June 24, 2018). Two independent reviews were performed in a random sample of 200 articles, including clinical trials (N = 50), economic evaluations (N = 50), systematic reviews (N = 50), and animal research studies (N = 50). The use of reporting guidelines to guide the reporting of research studies was considered appropriate. Inappropriate uses included the use of the reporting guidelines as a tool to assess the methodological quality of studies or as a guideline on how to design and conduct the studies. RESULTS: Across all selected reporting guidelines, appropriate use of reporting guidelines was observed in only 39% (95% CI: 32-46%; 78/200) of articles. By contrast, inappropriate use was observed in 41% (95% CI: 34-48%; 82/200), and unclear/other use was observed in 20% (95% CI: 15-26%; 40/200). CONCLUSIONS: Reporting guidelines of health research studies are frequently used inappropriately. Authors may require further education around appropriate use of the reporting guidelines in research reporting.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to acknowledge the contributions of Dr. Margaret Sampson, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Library Services, in designing the search strategy for this study. LC, FCL, JW, MK, JF and DM contributed to the study design, data collection, extraction, analysis, and manuscript preparation. WC and DH contributed to data collection, extraction, analysis and manuscript preparation. DA contributed to the study design, data collection, extraction and manuscript preparation.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherElsevier es_ES
dc.type.hasVersionSMURes_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectAnimal studieses_ES
dc.subjectClinical trialses_ES
dc.subjectEconomic evaluationses_ES
dc.subjectReporting guidelinees_ES
dc.subjectResearch reportinges_ES
dc.subjectSystematic reviewses_ES
dc.titleReporting guidelines of health research studies are frequently used inappropriatelyes_ES
dc.typejournal articlees_ES
dc.rights.licenseAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID32184126es_ES
dc.format.volume122es_ES
dc.format.page94es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jclinepi.2020.03.006es_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedes_ES
dc.identifier.e-issn1878-5921es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinepi.2020.03.006es_ES
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Clinical Epidemiologyes_ES
dc.repisalud.centroISCIII::Escuela Nacional de Sanidades_ES
dc.repisalud.institucionISCIIIes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsopen accesses_ES


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional
This item is licensed under a: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional