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dc.contributor.authorCastellote, Juan Manuel 
dc.contributor.authorVan den Berg, M E L
dc.contributor.authorValls-Solé, J
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-13T11:18:15Z
dc.date.available2020-04-13T11:18:15Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationBiomed Res Int. 2013;2013:471792.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2314-6133es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/9524
dc.description.abstractPreparation of the motor system for movement execution involves an increase in excitability of motor pathways. In a reaction time task paradigm, a startling auditory stimulus (SAS) delivered together with the imperative signal (IS) shortens reaction time significantly. In self-generated tasks we considered that an appropriately timed SAS would have similar effects. Eight subjects performed a ballistic wrist extension in two blocks: reaction, in which they responded to a visual IS, and action, in which they moved when they wished within a predetermined time window. In 20-25% of the trials, a SAS was applied. We recorded electromyographic activity of wrist extension and wrist movement kinematic variables. No effects of SAS were observed in action trials when movement was performed before or long after SAS application. However, a cluster of action trials was observed within 200 ms after SAS. These trials showed larger EMG bursts, shorter movement time, shorter time to peak velocity, and higher peak velocity than other action trials (P < 0.001 for all), with no difference from Reaction trials containing SAS. The results show that SAS influences the execution of self-generated human actions as it does with preprogrammed reaction time tasks during the assumed building up of preparatory activity before execution of the willed motor action.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by Instituto de Salud Carlos III Grant TPY 1529/07 (to J. M. Castellote) and Fundació Marató Grant TV3 110930 (to J. Valls-Solé).es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherHindawies_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subject.meshAdult es_ES
dc.subject.meshBiomechanical Phenomena es_ES
dc.subject.meshElectromyography es_ES
dc.subject.meshFemale es_ES
dc.subject.meshHumans es_ES
dc.subject.meshMale es_ES
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged es_ES
dc.subject.meshMotor Cortex es_ES
dc.subject.meshMovement es_ES
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance es_ES
dc.subject.meshReaction Time es_ES
dc.subject.meshWrist es_ES
dc.titleThe StartReact effect on self-initiated movementses_ES
dc.typeArtículoes_ES
dc.rights.licenseAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID24106706es_ES
dc.format.volume2013es_ES
dc.format.page471792es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2013/471792es_ES
dc.contributor.funderFundacio la Maratoes_ES
dc.contributor.funderInstituto de Salud Carlos III - ISCIIIes_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedes_ES
dc.identifier.e-issn2314-6141es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1155/2013/471792es_ES
dc.identifier.journalBioMed research internationales_ES
dc.repisalud.centroISCIII::Centro Nacional de Microbiologíaes_ES
dc.repisalud.institucionISCIIIes_ES
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu_repo/grantAgreement/ES/TPY 1529/07es_ES
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu_repo/grantAgreement/ES/TV3 110930es_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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Atribución 4.0 Internacional
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