Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAparicio-Ugarriza, Raquel
dc.contributor.authorMielgo-Ayuso, Juan
dc.contributor.authorRuiz, Emma 
dc.contributor.authorÁvila, José Manuel
dc.contributor.authorAranceta-Bartrina, Javier
dc.contributor.authorGil, Ángel
dc.contributor.authorOrtega, Rosa M
dc.contributor.authorSerra-Majem, Lluis
dc.contributor.authorVarela-Moreiras, Gregorio
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Gross, Marcela
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-14T11:47:57Z
dc.date.available2020-02-14T11:47:57Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationInt J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 Jan 20;17(2). pii: E668.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/9098
dc.description.abstractActive commuting (AC) has been proposed as a great opportunity to increase physical activity level (PA) in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study is to determine the associations between AC (walk and cycle commuting) and non-AC (motor vehicle commuting) with PA levels, and with AC and sedentarism in Spanish children and adolescents. A representative Spanish sample of 424 children and adolescents (38% females) was involved in the ANIBES (Anthropometry, Dietary Intake and Lifestyle in Spain) Study in 2013. Data on the levels of AC, non-AC, PA, and sedentarism were obtained using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire for adolescents. Stepwise backward univariate generalized linear and linear regression models were performed. In girls, walking was associated with playground PA, moderate PA, and moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (β = 0.007, p < 0.05; both β = 0.007, p < 0.01), respectively. In boys, walking was associated with all PA levels (p < 0.05); while cycling was related to moderate PA and MVPA (both β = 0.007, p < 0.05). A negative significant association was observed between AC and time spent studying without Internet use in boys (β = -0.184, p < 0.05). Commuting by walking contributes to increased daily PA in both sexes, whereas cycling was only related to moderate PA and MVPA in boys. Sedentary behaviors are not related to AC, but studying without Internet use was negatively associated with AC in boys.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThe ANIBES study was financially supported by a grant from Coca-Cola Iberia through an agreement with the Spanish Nutrition Foundation (FEN). The funding sponsor had no role in the design of the study; the collection, analysis, or interpretation of the data; the writing of the manuscript; nor the decision to publish the results.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherMDPIes_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectANIBES studyes_ES
dc.subjectcyclinges_ES
dc.subjectphysical activityes_ES
dc.subjectsedentary behaviorses_ES
dc.subjectwalkinges_ES
dc.subjectyouthes_ES
dc.titleActive Commuting, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviors in Children and Adolescents from Spain: Findings from the ANIBES Studyes_ES
dc.typeArtículoes_ES
dc.rights.licenseAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID31968634es_ES
dc.format.volume17es_ES
dc.format.number2es_ES
dc.format.page668es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph17020668es_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedes_ES
dc.identifier.e-issn1660-4601es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020668es_ES
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of environmental research and public healthes_ES
dc.repisalud.centroISCIII::Centro Nacional de Epidemologíaes_ES
dc.repisalud.institucionISCIIIes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


Files in this item

Acceso Abierto
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Atribución 4.0 Internacional
This item is licensed under a: Atribución 4.0 Internacional