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dc.contributor.authorOrtega-Loubon, Christian
dc.contributor.authorMuñoz-Moreno, María Fe
dc.contributor.authorGarcía, Irene Andrés
dc.contributor.authorÁlvarez, Francisco Javier
dc.contributor.authorGómez-Sánchez, Esther
dc.contributor.authorBustamante-Munguira, Juan
dc.contributor.authorLorenzo-López, Mario
dc.contributor.authorTamayo-Velasco, Álvaro
dc.contributor.authorJorge-Monjas, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorResino, Salvador 
dc.contributor.authorTamayo, Eduardo
dc.contributor.authorHeredia-Rodríguez, María
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-15T12:49:54Z
dc.date.available2020-01-15T12:49:54Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-22
dc.identifier.citationJ Clin Med. 2019 Oct 22;8(10). pii: E1755.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2077-0383es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/8890
dc.description.abstractMajor changes have occurred in the epidemiology and etiology of infective endocarditis (IE). Nevertheless, the differences between nosocomial infective endocarditis (NIE) and community-acquired infective endocarditis (CIE) have not been addressed in a population-based study. We conducted a retrospective, nationwide, temporal trend study from 1997 to 2014 analyzing the epidemiology, clinical, geographical, meteorological characteristics of patients diagnosed with IE in Spain, to distinguish NIE from CIE. Among 25,952 patients with IE (62.2 ± 18·6 years; 65.9% men), 45.9% had NIE. The incidence of IE increased from 2.83 to 3.73 due to the NIE incidence increment with a decline in CIE. Patients with NIE were older (63.8 years vs. 60.8 years, p < 0·001), presented a higher Charlson index (1.22 vs. 1.03, p < 0.001), a greater history of implanted cardiac devices (8.7% vs. 4.6%, p < 0.001), and higher mortality (31.5% vs. 21.7%, p < 0.001). The most frequent microorganism for both NIE and CIE was Staphylococcus (p < 0.001), and the North reported a higher incidence (p < 0.001). Risk factors of mortality for NIE were age, Charlson index, hemodialysis, shock, heart failure, and stroke. Risk factors for CIE included female sex, renal disease, and cardiac-device carriers. The etiology of IE shifted from community origins to mostly nosocomial-associated infections. Higher morbidity, mortality, and poorer outcomes are associated with NIE.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research received no external funding. The authors thank Consejería de Educación, Junta de Castilla y León, Spain (reference: VA161G18), for covering the publication charges of this article.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherMDPIes_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectcommunity-acquiredes_ES
dc.subjectinfective endocarditises_ES
dc.subjectlocationes_ES
dc.subjectmortalityes_ES
dc.subjectnosocomiales_ES
dc.titleNosocomial Vs. Community-Acquired Infective Endocarditis in Spain: Location, Trends, Clinical Presentation, Etiology, and Survival in the 21st Centuryes_ES
dc.typeArtículoes_ES
dc.rights.licenseAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID31652613es_ES
dc.format.volume8es_ES
dc.format.number10es_ES
dc.format.page1755es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/jcm8101755es_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101755es_ES
dc.identifier.journalJournal of clinical medicinees_ES
dc.repisalud.centroISCIII::Centro Nacional de Microbiologíaes_ES
dc.repisalud.institucionISCIIIes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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