Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yiyi
dc.contributor.authorPost, Wendy S
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Alan
dc.contributor.authorBlasco-Colmenares, Elena
dc.contributor.authorTomaselli, Gordon F
dc.contributor.authorGuallar, Eliseo 
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-07T11:16:18Z
dc.date.available2019-05-07T11:16:18Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One. 2013; 8(4):e59489es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/7547
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Altered thyroid status exerts a major effect on the heart. Individuals with hypo- or hyperthyroidism showed various changes in electrocardiograms. However, little is known about how variations in thyroid hormone levels within the normal range affect electrical activities of the heart in the general population. METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 5,990 men and women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Serum total T4 was measured by immunoassay and TSH was measured by chemiluminescent assay. We categorized T4 and TSH into 7 groups with cut-offs at the 5(th), 20(th), 40(th), 60(th), 80(th), and 95(th) percentiles of the weighted population distribution. Electrocardiographic parameters were measured from the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram. We found a positive linear association between serum total T4 level and heart rate in men, and a U-shape association between T4 and PR interval in men and women. TSH level was positively associated with QRS interval in men, while a U-shape association between TSH and QRS was observed in women. No clear graded association between thyroid hormones and corrected QT or JT was found, except that men in the highest category of T4 levels appeared to have longer corrected QT and JT, and men in the lowest category of T4 appeared to have shorter corrected QT and JT. CONCLUSIONS: Variation in thyroid hormone levels in the general population, even within the normal range, was associated with various ECG changes.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThe present study was funded in part by grants from the National Center for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC Translational Cardiology grant 2008-03), the National Institutes of Health (grants ES015597 and HL091062), and the Donald W. Reynolds Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center at Johns Hopkins University.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciencees_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subject.meshFemale es_ES
dc.subject.meshHeart Rate es_ES
dc.subject.meshHumans es_ES
dc.subject.meshMale es_ES
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged es_ES
dc.subject.meshThyroid Hormones es_ES
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin es_ES
dc.subject.meshThyroxine es_ES
dc.subject.meshElectrocardiography es_ES
dc.subject.meshNutrition Surveys es_ES
dc.titleThyroid hormones and electrocardiographic parameters: findings from the third national health and nutrition examination surveyes_ES
dc.typeArtículoes_ES
dc.rights.licenseAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID23593140es_ES
dc.format.volume8es_ES
dc.format.number4es_ES
dc.format.pagee59489es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0059489es_ES
dc.contributor.funderCentro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC)es_ES
dc.contributor.funderNational Institues of Health (United States)es_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedes_ES
dc.identifier.e-issn1932-6203es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0059489es_ES
dc.identifier.journalPloS onees_ES
dc.repisalud.orgCNICCNIC::Grupos de investigación::Antiguos CNICes_ES
dc.repisalud.institucionCNICes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


Files in this item

Acceso Abierto
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Atribución 4.0 Internacional
This item is licensed under a: Atribución 4.0 Internacional