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dc.contributor.authorEzkurdia, Iakes 
dc.contributor.authorCalvo, Enrique 
dc.contributor.authorDel Pozo, Angela
dc.contributor.authorVazquez, Jesus 
dc.contributor.authorValencia, Alfonso 
dc.contributor.authorTress, Michael L.
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T13:32:28Z
dc.date.available2017-10-30T13:32:28Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifierISI:000364549800001
dc.identifier.citationExpert Rev Proteomics. 2015; 12(6):579-93
dc.identifier.issn1478-9450
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/5259
dc.description.abstractThe authors have carried out an investigation of the two draft maps of the human proteome published in 2014 in Nature. The findings include an abundance of poor spectra, low-scoring peptide-spectrum matches and incorrectly identified proteins in both these studies, highlighting clear issues with the application of false discovery rates. This noise means that the claims made by the two papers - the identification of high numbers of protein coding genes, the detection of novel coding regions and the draft tissue maps themselves - should be treated with considerable caution. The authors recommend that clinicians and researchers do not use the unfiltered data from these studies. Despite this these studies will inspire further investigation into tissue-based proteomics. As long as this future work has proper quality controls, it could help produce a consensus map of the human proteome and improve our understanding of the processes that underlie health and disease.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis paper is supported by a National Institutes of Health grant [U41 HG007234] and by the Spanish Ministry of Economics and Competitiveness [BIO2012-40205, BIO2012-37926 PRB2-ProteoRed-PT13/0001/0017 RD07-0067-0014-COMBIOMED, RETICS-RD12-0042-0056]. The authors have no other relevant affiliations or financial involvement with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript apart from those disclosed.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis 
dc.type.hasVersionVoR
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectClinical applications
dc.subjectfalse discovery rates
dc.subjecthuman proteome
dc.subjectprotein coding genes
dc.subjectproteomics
dc.subjectFALSE DISCOVERY RATE
dc.subjectSORF-ENCODED POLYPEPTIDES
dc.subjectMASS-SPECTROMETRY
dc.subjectMISSING PROTEINS
dc.subjectCODING GENES
dc.subjectHUMAN GENOME
dc.subjectIDENTIFICATION
dc.subjectPROJECT
dc.subjectDATABASE
dc.subjectPEPTIDE
dc.titleThe potential clinical impact of the release of two drafts of the human proteome
dc.typejournal article
dc.rights.licenseAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID26496066
dc.format.volume12
dc.format.page579-593
dc.identifier.doi10.1586/14789450.2015.1103186
dc.contributor.funderNational Institutes of Health (Estados Unidos) 
dc.contributor.funderMinisterio de Economía y Competitividad (España) 
dc.description.peerreviewed
dc.identifier.e-issn1744-8387
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1586/14789450.2015.1103186
dc.identifier.journalExpert Review of Proteomics
dc.repisalud.orgCNICCNIC::Grupos de investigación::Proteómica cardiovascular
dc.repisalud.orgCNICCNIC::Unidades técnicas::Proteómica / Metabolómica
dc.repisalud.institucionCNIC
dc.rights.accessRightsopen accesses_ES


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