Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRedondo-Sánchez, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorPetrova, Dafina
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-Barranco, Miguel
dc.contributor.authorFernandez-Navarro, Pablo 
dc.contributor.authorJimenez-Moleon, Jose J.
dc.contributor.authorSánchez, Maria-José
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-19T08:24:23Z
dc.date.available2022-05-19T08:24:23Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-13
dc.identifier.citationCancers (Basel). 2022 Jan 13;14(2):398.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2072-6694es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/14419
dc.description.abstractIn the past decade, evidence has accumulated about socio-economic inequalities in very diverse lung cancer outcomes. To better understand the global effects of socio-economic factors in lung cancer, we conducted an overview of systematic reviews. Four databases were searched for systematic reviews reporting on the relationship between measures of socio-economic status (SES) (individual or area-based) and diverse lung cancer outcomes, including epidemiological indicators and diagnosis- and treatment-related variables. AMSTAR-2 was used to assess the quality of the selected systematic reviews. Eight systematic reviews based on 220 original studies and 8 different indicators were identified. Compared to people with a high SES, people with a lower SES appear to be more likely to develop and die from lung cancer. People with lower SES also have lower cancer survival, most likely due to the lower likelihood of receiving both traditional and next-generation treatments, higher rates of comorbidities, and the higher likelihood of being admitted as emergency. People with a lower SES are generally not diagnosed at later stages, but this may change after broader implementation of lung cancer screening, as early evidence suggests that there may be socio-economic inequalities in its use.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipHigh resolution study of social inequalities in cancer (HiReSIC), Spanish Association against Cancer (AECC) (PROYE20023SÁNC). Cancer Epidemiological Surveillance Subprogram (VICA) of the CIBERESP, Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. Dafina Petrova is supported by a Juan de la Cierva Fellowship from the Ministry of Science and the National Research Agency of Spain (MCIN/AEI, JC2019-039691-I, http://doi.org/10.13039/501100011033, accessed on 4 October 2021).es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) es_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectDiagnosises_ES
dc.subjectDisparitieses_ES
dc.subjectEducationes_ES
dc.subjectIncomees_ES
dc.subjectInequalitieses_ES
dc.subjectLung canceres_ES
dc.subjectSocio-economices_ES
dc.subjectSurvivales_ES
dc.subjectTreatmentes_ES
dc.titleSocio-Economic Inequalities in Lung Cancer Outcomes: An Overview of Systematic Reviewses_ES
dc.typeArtículoes_ES
dc.rights.licenseAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID35053559es_ES
dc.format.volume14es_ES
dc.format.number2es_ES
dc.format.page398es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/cancers14020398es_ES
dc.contributor.funderInstituto de Salud Carlos III es_ES
dc.contributor.funderMinisterio de Ciencia e Innovación (España)es_ES
dc.contributor.funderAgencia Estatal de Investigación (España)es_ES
dc.contributor.funderAsociación Española Contra el Cánceres_ES
dc.contributor.funderCentro de Investigación Biomédica en Red - CIBERESP (Epidemiología y Salud Pública)es_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/cancers14020398es_ES
dc.identifier.journalCancerses_ES
dc.repisalud.centroISCIII::Centro Nacional de Epidemologíaes_ES
dc.repisalud.institucionISCIIIes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.relation.projectFECYTinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/JC2019-039691-Ies_ES


Files in this item

Acceso Abierto
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Atribución 4.0 Internacional
This item is licensed under a: Atribución 4.0 Internacional