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dc.contributor.authorMotas, Miguel 
dc.contributor.authorJerez, Silvia
dc.contributor.authorEsteban, Marta 
dc.contributor.authorValera, Francisco
dc.contributor.authorCuervo, José Javier
dc.contributor.authorBarbosa, Andrés
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-03T10:25:29Z
dc.date.available2022-05-03T10:25:29Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-21
dc.identifier.citationInt J Environ Res Public Health. 2021;18(18):9918.es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/14236
dc.description.abstractPolar regions, symbols of wilderness, have been identified as potential sinks of mercury coming from natural and anthropogenic sources at lower latitudes. Changes in ice coverage currently occurring in some areas such as the Antarctic Peninsula could enhance these phenomena and their impacts on local biota. As long-lived species at the top of food chains, seabirds are particularly sensitive to this highly toxic metal with the capacity to be biomagnified. Specifically, their feathers can be useful for Hg monitoring since they mainly accumulate its most toxic and persistent form, methyl-Hg. To that end, feathers of gentoo (Pygoscelis papua), chinstrap (P. antarcticus), and Adélie penguins (P. adeliae) (n = 108) were collected by passive sampling in seven different locations throughout the Antarctic Peninsula area and analyzed by ICP-MS after microwave-digestion. More than 93% of the samples showed detectable Hg levels (range: 6.3-12,529.8 ng g-1 dry weight), and the highest ones were found in the feathers of chinstrap penguins from King George Island. Hg bioconcentration and biomagnification seem to be occurring in the Antarctic food web, giving rise to high but non-toxic Hg levels in penguins, similar to those previously found in Arctic seabirds.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research has been funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation CGL2004-01348, POL2006-05175, and CGL2007-60369.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) es_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectAntarctic Peninsulaes_ES
dc.subjectFeatherses_ES
dc.subjectMercuryes_ES
dc.subjectPenguinses_ES
dc.subjectBiomonitoringes_ES
dc.titleMercury Levels in Feathers of Penguins from the Antarctic Peninsula Area: Geographical and Inter-Specific Differenceses_ES
dc.typeArtículoes_ES
dc.rights.licenseAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID34574839es_ES
dc.format.volume18es_ES
dc.format.number18es_ES
dc.format.page9918es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph18189918es_ES
dc.contributor.funderMinisterio de Ciencia e Innovación (España)es_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedes_ES
dc.identifier.e-issn1660-4601es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189918es_ES
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthes_ES
dc.repisalud.centroISCIII::Centro Nacional de Sanidad Ambientales_ES
dc.repisalud.institucionISCIIIes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.relation.projectFECYTinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MEC//POL2006-05175/ES/LA SALUD EN LAS POBLACIONES DE PINGUINOS ANTARTICOS: CONTRIBUCION AL PROYECTO IPY SALUD DE POBLACIONES DE AVES DEL ARTICO Y LA ANTARTIDA/ es_ES
dc.relation.projectFECYTinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/CGL2007-60369es_ES
dc.relation.projectFECYTinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/CGL2004-01348es_ES


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