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dc.contributor.authorMessa, Augusto
dc.contributor.authorKöster, Pamela Carolina 
dc.contributor.authorGarrine, Marcelino
dc.contributor.authorNhampossa, Tacilta
dc.contributor.authorMassora, Sérgio
dc.contributor.authorCossa, Anélsio
dc.contributor.authorBassat, Quique
dc.contributor.authorKotloff, Karen
dc.contributor.authorLevine, Myron M
dc.contributor.authorAlonso, Pedro L
dc.contributor.authorCarmena, David 
dc.contributor.authorMandomando, Inácio
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-06T09:15:59Z
dc.date.available2021-05-06T09:15:59Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-09
dc.identifier.citationPathogens. 2021 Apr 9;10(4):452.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2076-0817es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/12889
dc.description.abstractCryptosporidium is a leading cause of childhood diarrhoea and associated physical and cognitive impairment in low-resource settings. Cryptosporidium-positive faecal samples (n = 190) from children aged ≤ 5 years enrolled in the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) in Mozambique detected by ELISA (11.5%, 430/3754) were successfully PCR-amplified and sequenced at the gp60 or ssu rRNA loci for species determination and genotyping. Three Cryptosporidium species including C. hominis (72.6%, 138/190), C. parvum (22.6%, 43/190), and C. meleagridis (4.2%, 8/190) were detected. Children ≤ 23 months were more exposed to Cryptosporidium spp. infections than older children. Both C. hominis and C. parvum were more prevalent among children with diarrhoeal disease compared to those children without it (47.6% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.007 and 23.7% vs. 11.8%, p = 0.014, respectively). A high intra-species genetic variability was observed within C. hominis (subtype families Ia, Ib, Id, Ie, and If) and C. parvum (subtype families IIb, IIc, IIe, and IIi) but not within C. meleagridis (subtype family IIIb). No association between Cryptosporidium species/genotypes and child's age was demonstrated. The predominance of C. hominis and C. parvum IIc suggests that most of the Cryptosporidium infections were anthroponotically transmitted, although zoonotic transmission events also occurred at an unknown rate. The role of livestock, poultry, and other domestic animal species as sources of environmental contamination and human cryptosporidiosis should be investigated in further molecular epidemiological studies in Mozambique.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation through the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland, School of Medicine who coordinated GEMS, grant number 38874 (GEMS) and OPP1033572 (GEMS1A). Additional funding was obtained from the Health Institute Carlos III (ISCIII), Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Spain), grant number PI16CIII/00024, from the Fundo Nacional de Investigacão, Ministry of Science and Technology (Mozambique), grant number 245-INV, and from the USAID Country Office of Mozambique, grant number AID-656-F-16-00002.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherMDPIes_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPreprintes_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCryptosporidiumes_ES
dc.subjectGEMSes_ES
dc.subjectMozambiquees_ES
dc.subjectchildrenes_ES
dc.subjectdiarrhoeaes_ES
dc.subjectgenotypinges_ES
dc.subjectgp60es_ES
dc.subjectmolecular epidemiologyes_ES
dc.subjectprevalencees_ES
dc.subjectssu rRNAes_ES
dc.titleMolecular Characterisation of Cryptosporidium spp. in Mozambican Children Younger than 5 Years Enrolled in a Matched Case-Control Study on the Aetiology of Diarrhoeal Disease.es_ES
dc.typeArtículoes_ES
dc.rights.licenseAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID33918893es_ES
dc.format.volume10es_ES
dc.format.number4es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/pathogens10040452es_ES
dc.contributor.funderBill & Melinda Gates Foundationes_ES
dc.contributor.funderInstituto de Salud Carlos III - ISCIIIes_ES
dc.contributor.funderMinisterio de Economía y Competitividad (España)es_ES
dc.contributor.funderMinistry of Science and Technology (Mozambique)es_ES
dc.contributor.funderUSAID Country Office of Mozambiquees_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedNoes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10040452es_ES
dc.identifier.journalPathogens (Basel, Switzerland)es_ES
dc.repisalud.centroISCIII::Centro Nacional de Microbiologíaes_ES
dc.repisalud.institucionISCIIIes_ES
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/PI16CIII/00024es_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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Atribución 4.0 Internacional
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