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dc.contributor.authorSempere, Julio 
dc.contributor.authorLlamosí, Mirella
dc.contributor.authorDel Río Menéndez, Idoia
dc.contributor.authorLópez Ruiz, Beatriz
dc.contributor.authorDomenech, Mirian 
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Camacho, Fernando 
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-16T13:05:15Z
dc.date.available2021-04-16T13:05:15Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-20
dc.identifier.citationVaccines (Basel) . 2021 Feb 20;9(2):181.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2076-393Xes_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12105/12679
dc.description.abstractStreptococcus pneumoniae is a pathogen responsible for millions of deaths worldwide. Currently, the available vaccines for the prevention of S. pneumoniae infections are the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide-based vaccine (PPV-23) and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV10 and PCV13). These vaccines only cover some pneumococcal serotypes (up to 100 different serotypes have been identified) and are unable to protect against non-vaccine serotypes and non-encapsulated pneumococci. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant non-vaccine serotypes after these vaccines is an increasing threat. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new pneumococcal vaccines which could cover a wide range of serotypes. One of the vaccines most characterized as a prophylactic alternative to current PPV-23 or PCVs is a vaccine based on pneumococcal protein antigens. The choline-binding proteins (CBP) are found in all pneumococcal strains, giving them the characteristic to be potential vaccine candidates as they may protect against different serotypes. In this review, we have focused the attention on different CBPs as vaccine candidates because they are involved in the pathogenesis process, confirming their immunogenicity and protection against pneumococcal infection. The review summarizes the major contribution of these proteins to virulence and reinforces the fact that antibodies elicited against many of them may block or interfere with their role in the infection process.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by Ministerio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad (Grant number SAF2017-83388).es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherMDPIes_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectStreptococcus pneumoniaees_ES
dc.subjectcholine-binding proteinses_ES
dc.subjectpneumococcal vaccineses_ES
dc.subjectprotein vaccineses_ES
dc.titlePneumococcal Choline-Binding Proteins Involved in Virulence as Vaccine Candidates.es_ES
dc.typeArtículoes_ES
dc.rights.licenseAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.identifier.pubmedID33672701es_ES
dc.format.volume9es_ES
dc.format.number2es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/vaccines9020181es_ES
dc.contributor.funderMinisterio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad (España)es_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9020181es_ES
dc.identifier.journalVaccineses_ES
dc.repisalud.centroISCIII::Centro Nacional de Microbiologíaes_ES
dc.repisalud.institucionISCIIIes_ES
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/ES/SAF2017-83388es_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES


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Atribución 4.0 Internacional
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